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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Recent articles

Islands 2050: What will the Gulf Islands look like in 25 years?

Islands 2050: What will the Gulf Islands look like in 25 years?
The preservation and protection of BC’s Gulf Islands “for the benefit of residents of the trust area and of the province generally” has been charged to the Islands Trust. However, recent decision-making has demonstrated that a majority of Local Trustee’s are focusing on different priorities. In February, Raincoast submitted feedback as part of a public engagement process seeking input on the Islands Trust Policy Statement in two areas: climate change and affordable housing within the Islands Trust area.

Behind The Glass Hunting with Chris Darimont and Chris Pryn

Behind The Glass Hunting with Chris Darimont and Chris Pryn
Chris Darimont spoke with hunter and podcaster Chris Pryn to discuss their shared interests in hunting and habitat protection, and also to figure out where they disagree. It’s a remarkable interview, in part, because both Darimont and Pryn work so hard to have a respectful conversation despite their differences.

Otolith study confirms Harrison Chinook salmon rely on the Fraser River Estuary for early growth

Otolith study confirms Harrison Chinook salmon rely on the Fraser River Estuary for early growth
Chinook salmon from the Harrison River, which was declared Canada’s first Salmon Stronghold, do something unique; rather than growing in their home lake and river system for the first year or more as many other salmon do, these fish go on a great adventure.

New research identifies ancient culturally-modified trees, and with them the future of forest management

New research identifies ancient culturally-modified trees, and with them the future of forest management
After practising sustainable forest management for millennia, the Kitasoo/Xai’xais Nation has looked to its ancient cedar trees to help guide the future of its forests stewardship.

Join us for a webinar on conservation in action

Join us for a webinar on conservation in action
Join us Wednesday April 7 at 1pm Pacific for Coastal Insights as we look at key conservation issues facing wildlife and their habitat along BC’s coast. The lesson will also discuss how we can take action to protect and sustain the Salish Sea.