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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Latest News

Howling wolf

The home stretch to protect the Kitlope’s coastal carnivores

Two generous donors have confirmed that they will step up to match half of the funds needed to get us to our final goal of $650,000. Now, the impact of every dollar you donate is doubled!

Grizzly Bear

Year two of grizzly bear behaviour monitoring in the Atnarko Corridor, Nuxalk Territory

Patience, attention to detail, and the ability to adapt are a few human qualities that many strive to attain. Grizzly bear field research here on the Atnarko River, Nuxalk Territory, affords our crew the opportunity to develop those traits and put them to the test.

The Lower Fraser river as seen from the air with city in the background.

Watersheds 2020 Forum – some lessons from the Lower Fraser River

Raincoast will be hosting a session titled, ‘Watershed governance in a complex geography: Lessons and updates from the Lower Fraser Working Group’. This session will occur on Friday, October 16th at 1pm PST…

Three youth undergo Raincoast’s first year-long training program

The new year-long training program in the Salish Sea Emerging Stewards program provides leadership skills and provides the Junior Leaders the opportunity to connect with local scientists, educators and Indigenous knowledge keepers…

Some good news for 2020? How about ending commercial trophy hunting in the 5,300 km2 Kitlope hunting tenure

I first visited the Kitlope Valley thirty years ago aboard the Maple Leaf at the invitation of the Haisla and Xenaksiala people who were fighting to save their homeland from clearcut logging. This was the beginning of my own journey…

A Southern Resident killer whale fin above the water in the Salish Sea with graphs from a research paper in the foreground.

Research: Compliance of small vessels to minimum distance regulations for humpback and killer whales in the Salish Sea

The rise of vessel traffic, the growth of the whale watching industry, increased interactions between whales and small vessels, and the precarious existence of Southern Residents in particular, has given rise to some regulations from the federal government that attempt to mitigate the harm these interactions pose…

Measuring tree heights with lasers

Measuring the heights of trees in the Coastal Douglas-fir (CDF) zone is quite a feat. In mature CDF forests (which, unfortunately, are increasingly hard to find), individual trees can grow up to 90 metres tall! But in the Gulf Islands, where most forests have been cut at some point in the not-so-distant past, second growth […]