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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Latest News

Doug Neasloss speaks to the crowd at the Pipe Shop for BC Bear Day 2019.

BC Bear Day was a success!

BC Bear Day this past weekend was a grand success. We saw lots of kids, teddy bears in hand, residents looking for tips on how to coexist with bears and people generally interested in learning more about bears. The afternoon portion of the event was filled with presentations, games, face painting, bear yoga and an […]

Grass in the foreground gives way to epic mountains of the Kitlope valley.

Kitlope River estuary visit

This spot on a map of BC means little until you follow the 70-mile Gardner Canal that branches off Devastation Channel and winds its way deep into the coastal mountains of northern BC.  While single-handing my old wooden sailboat, ERN, I was reminded of my first trip to the mountains and the thrill of seeing […]

Close up of a painting of a golden grizzly.

BC Bear Day photography exhibit

As part of BC Bear Day – this Sunday in North Vancouver – you can view a fantastic collection of wildlife photography that will, of course, include BC Bears. You can take a sneak peak below, and we hope you can view them in person.  The event is hosted in the stunning heritage status Pipe-Shop, […]

A polar bear rolls on their back with their mouth open, and there's a graph floating in the top right.

Research: Trophy hunters pay more to target larger-bodied carnivores

The behaviour of human hunters diverges from other animals. Other predators tend to target vulnerable individuals in prey populations. Humans, often males, tend to hunt large, reproductive-aged individuals. In the case of guided trophy hunting these species are likely perceived as costly, by increasing failure risk and risk of injury, and providing lower nutritional returns.

Dave Scott, Misty MacDuffee, Lia Chalifour, and Charlie Clark work in the Fraser River Estuary.

How new research on habitats within the Fraser River estuary implicates conservation strategy

Raincoast biologist Misty MacDuffee joined Mark Brennae on CFAX 1070 to talk about the Fraser River and the fish that rely on its distinct and interconnected habitat. The Fraser Estuary supports more than 100 species that are recognized as “at-risk” (threatened, endangered or of concern) either provincially or federally.1 Misty MacDuffee is part of a […]

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