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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Killer whales in a tight formation on the BC coast.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf hunkers down and watches outwardly in a rock outcropping and their colour is remarkably similar.

Working with our Coastal First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A salt marsh at the mouth of the Fraser River is used by juvenile salmon, other fish species, and thousands of resident and migratory birds. Photo: M. MacDuffee

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of juvenile wild salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Five Southern Resident killer whales swim side by side in the Salish Sea.

Feds’ fisheries announcement a welcome first step: groups renew call for killer whale emergency order

Conservation groups are applauding today’s announcement from Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Dominic LeBlanc and Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna that endangered Southern Resident killer whales face “imminent threats” to their survival and recovery. Prompted by this assessment, the Ministers also announced immediate fisheries closures in key Southern Resident foraging areas …

A Pacific herring stops moving for a moment; figures from the research about herring are on the right hand side.

Pacific herring spawn events influence nearshore subtidal and intertidal species

Although we know that herring play a pivotal ecological role in nearshore ecosystems, from a scientific perspective little is known about the amount of energy and nutrients they transfer from the ocean to the land. Therefore, researchers at Raincoast Conservation Foundation, University of Victoria, and Dalhousie University, aimed to determine if the nutrients that herring […]

A grizzly bear meanders in the Great Bear rainforest.

Confronting the elephant (head) in the room – researchers challenge the conservation community on the ethics of trophy hunting

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists is challenging the conservation community to fully consider the ethics of trophy hunting and think critically about endorsing the practice as a key funding mechanism for wildlife protection. Read our new paper, “The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy […]

A lion head is attached as a trophy to a post overlooking a large expanse of desert, and several University logos on the right hand side.

Conservation Letters: The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy hunting

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists argue that trophy hunting – hunting that involves the collection of animal body parts, or “trophies,” – is morally wrong. Led by Chelsea Batavia from the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, the authors identify trophy hunting as […]

A bear stands in the distant grass and fog to get a better look or maybe smell.

On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

For years, British Columbia’s wildlife management practices, especially its wolf cull and grizzly bear hunt, have been controversial. In 2015, then-Premier Christy Clark defended the province’s wildlife policies, stating they were grounded in sound science. That, at least, was the claim. And not one unique to British Columbia. In fact, hunting in Canada and the […]


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