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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Staqeya: the lone wolf at the edge of its ecological niche

Collins, D., Alexander, C., and Darimont, C.T. 2018. Staqeya: the lone wolf at the edge of its ecological niche. Ecology 100(1), e02513. Link to the article.

Read the open access article

“In May 2012, a lone wolf (Canis lupus) appeared in Victoria, British Columbia (BC), Canada, a metropolitan area on the southern tip of Vancouver Island with a population of 365,000 (Fig. 1A, B). After sightings in backyards over a few days, the wolf settled in the adjacent Chatham and Discovery Islands. This wolf traveled a minimum of ~40 km from the nearest known wolf distribution, and through at least ~20 km of suburbia before swimming 1.5 km to the islands.”

Protecting killer whales

Southern Resident Killer Whales in the Salish Sea.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf walks out on the wet flats on the west coast of BC.

Working with our First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A Raincoaster dips a science looking thingy into the Lower Fraser River to test for something. Because science.

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and its partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of wild juvenile salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Roe Lake on North Pender, on a blue sky day.

Protecting the evergreen giants at the edge of the sea

The rainshadow region, extending across the southeastern coast of Vancouver Island from Metchosin to Deep Bay; covering the Gulf Islands, and reaching the Sunshine Coast, has been subject to rampant land conversion—by some estimates up to 50%…

Tsawout First Nation, University of Guelph, University of Victoria, and Raincoast Conservation Foundation logos on top of an aerial photo from Fort McKay.

New research: Indigenous knowledge and federal environmental assessments in Canada

A team of non-Indigenous and Indigenous researchers identifies surmountable and deep-rooted obstacles to improving how the federal Impact Assessment Act incorporates Indigenous Knowledge and engages with Indigenous Knowledge systems…

A wolf lies down and stares into the lens of the photographer from across the beach.

Rainwolf is the last to go

We are now busy raising the remaining funds to meet our $650,000 target for the Kitlope tenure. We’ll soon be updating you as to how close we are to that target…

Chinook salmon on the bottom of the river bed.

Backgrounder: The 2019 fishery and endangered Fraser Chinook

This backgrounder on endangered Fraser Chinook has been produced by Raincoast Conservation Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation, and Watershed Watch…

A tiny bird rests in the rigging of the vessel, Achiever.

Notes from the Great Bear

Umbrella species like the grizzly bear and apex predators such as the killer whale are a focus of Raincoast’s conservation efforts precisely because they are reliant on a broader range of species and processes, and a more complex system to which they contribute to and depend on…

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

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