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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Killer whales in a tight formation on the BC coast.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf hunkers down and watches outwardly in a rock outcropping and their colour is remarkably similar.

Working with our Coastal First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A Raincoaster dips a science looking thingy into the Lower Fraser River to test for something. Because science.

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and its partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of wild juvenile salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Transmountain, or Taxpayer Mountain

Trans Mountain is now Taxpayer Mountain

The Canadian federal government’s purchase of the Trans Mountain project from Kinder Morgan is financially and environmentally dubious. With this decision, Trans Mountain should now be renamed Taxpayer Mountain…

Southern Resident killer whales: J2 (right) and juvenile J45 (left) chasing a salmon.

Government declares “imminent threat” to survival of Southern Resident killer whales

Last week, the government announced fisheries closures in some key Southern Resident foraging areas. While welcome news, the measures only partially address our concerns over food availability and disturbance to endangered killer whales…

Waters of the Great Bear Rainforest turn a milky turquoise with Pacific herring during spawning.

Protecting (marine) subsidies – nutrient flows from ocean to land

Researchers at Raincoast aimed to determine if the nutrients that herring contribute to intertidal and subtidal ecosystems during spawning events are cycling through coastal food webs. To determine this, our scientists adopted techniques used in salmon research ….

Misty MacDuffee stands in the rain explaining the risks to SRKWs.

Misty MacDuffee speaks to lack of government action on Southern Resident killer whales

What is the Government of Canada doing to protect Southern Resident killer whales? Misty MacDuffee discusses how the overlapping risks to these whales have not been addressed as of May 2018, with host Adam Sterling at CFAX 1070

Southern Resident killer whale mother and juvenile.

Oil tankers: a killer for whales

The National Energy Board recommended approval of the Trans Mountain expansion knowing the Kinder Morgan project would jeopardize the survival of the Southern Residents…


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