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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Killer whales in a tight formation on the BC coast.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Secure Coastal Carnivores

A wolf hunkers down and watches outwardly in a rock outcropping and their colour is remarkably similar.

Working with our Coastal First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Secure Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A salt marsh at the mouth of the Fraser River is used by juvenile salmon, other fish species, and thousands of resident and migratory birds. Photo: M. MacDuffee

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of juvenile wild salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Juvenile killer whale and mother off the coast of British Columbia.

National Energy Board’s failure haunts governments

The cries of condemnation emanating from the Alberta and Canadian federal governments in response to new restrictions on the transport of diluted bitumen announced by the province of British Columbia are deafening. The burgeoning conflict began when BC announced the province would limit shipments of diluted bitumen transported from Alberta…

Southern Resident killer whales swim side by side, as seen from the air.

A killer whale emergency

We are requesting an emergency order under Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Southern Resident killer whales were recognized as endangered in 2002. Despite this, the Federal Government has taken no action to date to reduce the threats to these whales…

Achiever rests, sails down, in the twilight.

Sailing with Raincoast in 2018

In May, our spring ‘hunts’ visited lush estuaries as the days grew longer and bears were down low grazing on sedges. Marine wildlife started to make their way back to the rich, cold waters of the coast. Their annual migration to foraging areas beginning and lasting well…

Southern Resident killer whales swim side by side in the Salish Sea, with joint partner logos on the right, including David Suzuki Foundation

Critical situation for Southern Resident killer whales provokes call for urgent action

Only 76 Southern Resident killer whales remain. This is a critical situation. Today, represented by Ecojustice, and in collaboration with other science and environmental organizations, we are calling on the Canadian government to take immediate action to protect these whales…

A map of the proposed emergency order, with logos of the various orgs involved including Ecojustice and the David Suzuki Foundation.

Emergency order requested for Southern Resident killer whales: time is running out

Raincoast and its partners, represented by Ecojustice, are calling on federal cabinet ministers LeBlanc and McKenna to recommend cabinet issue an emergency order under Canada’s Species at Risk Act…


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