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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Southern Resident Killer Whales in the Salish Sea.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf walks out on the wet flats on the west coast of BC.

Working with our First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A Raincoaster dips a science looking thingy into the Lower Fraser River to test for something. Because science.

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and its partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of wild juvenile salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Close up of a painting of a golden grizzly.

BC Bear Day photography exhibit

As part of BC Bear Day – this Sunday in North Vancouver – you can view a fantastic collection of wildlife photography that will, of course, include BC Bears. You can take a sneak peak below, and we hope you can view them in person.  The event is hosted in the stunning heritage status Pipe-Shop, […]

A polar bear rolls on their back with their mouth open, and there's a graph floating in the top right.

Research: Trophy hunters pay more to target larger-bodied carnivores

The behaviour of human hunters diverges from other animals. Other predators tend to target vulnerable individuals in prey populations. Humans, often males, tend to hunt large, reproductive-aged individuals. In the case of guided trophy hunting these species are likely perceived as costly, by increasing failure risk and risk of injury, and providing lower nutritional returns.

Dave Scott, Misty MacDuffee, Lia Chalifour, and Charlie Clark work in the Fraser River Estuary.

How new research on habitats within the Fraser River estuary implicates conservation strategy

Raincoast biologist Misty MacDuffee joined Mark Brennae on CFAX 1070 to talk about the Fraser River and the fish that rely on its distinct and interconnected habitat. The Fraser Estuary supports more than 100 species that are recognized as “at-risk” (threatened, endangered or of concern) either provincially or federally.1 Misty MacDuffee is part of a […]

The Tooth and Nail is a sailboat and it is shown here sailing very fast.

Buy a boat, help protect coastal carnivores

We have a fantastic opportunity for you to own a beautiful sailboat while supporting the conservation of wildlife at the same time. Tooth and Nail was donated to us by the family of the late Ronald Martin. Ronald and his family have been longtime supporters of Raincoast. Ron loved to sail Tooth and Nail as […]

An expansive view of a Raincoast scientist working in the field in the Fraser River estuary.

Research: Habitat use by juvenile salmon, other migratory fish, and resident fish species underscores the importance of estuarine habitat mosaics

Pacific salmon, especially Chinook and Chum, reside and feed in estuaries during downstream migrations. But the extent to which they rely on estuaries, and which habitats within estuaries, is not well understood. We need to understand this complexity if we are going to enact effective conservation policies. This is especially important in urban systems where habitat loss is ongoing, and at different rates across the estuarine mosaic. The Fraser River estuary, for example, supports a multitude of fish species…

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

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