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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Killer whales in a tight formation on the BC coast.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf hunkers down and watches outwardly in a rock outcropping and their colour is remarkably similar.

Working with our Coastal First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A Raincoaster dips a science looking thingy into the Lower Fraser River to test for something. Because science.

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and its partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of wild juvenile salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Baylee runs in the XTERRA Victoria Trail Run

Trail running to safeguard the Nadeea tenure

I was a little out of my comfort zone to ask people to donate, but it was so worth it! My fundraising for Raincoast has been about giving back to the natural world that sustains me and that sustains my love of running…

Giordano Corlazzoli and his parents stand together after a marathon.

Giordano Corlazzoli: Running for Coastal Carnivores

The planned route for my run takes me over 500 kilometers from Port Hardy to Victoria, traveling along the Old Island Highway when possible. I will be running about a marathon’s distance a day, with the actual daily distance varying from as little as 32 km, to as much as…

L92 comes to the surface to get a better look around; spyhop.

Endangered killer whales still await real action

The imminent threats to the survival of these whales require the federal government to take immediate action to reduce those threats, not ramp them up. The federal government already faces one killer-whale lawsuit for approving the Trans Mountain project and violating the Species at Risk Act.

Achiever sits quietly on the coast of the Great Bear Rainforest while a bear wades through the shallow water in the foreground.

Win a wildlife adventure with Raincoast

The competition rules are simple: raise or donate $5,000 for our Safeguarding Coastal Carnivores campaign by Thanksgiving (October 8th, 2018) and you will be entered with a chance to win a ten-day trip for two with Raincoast in the fall of 2019…

Misty MacDuffee at the head office of Raincoast in Sidney, with the CFAX logo.

Misty MacDuffee speaks with Adam Stirling about the death of L92

The federal government has made several announcements designed to reduce threats to Southern Resident killer whales. With the death of another killer whale (L92) last week, are we doing enough? Misty MacDuffee speaks with CFAX’s Adam Stirling about these issues…


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