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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Protecting killer whales

Killer whales in a tight formation on the BC coast.

Raincoast uses science, public education and the courts to protect Canada’s endangered salmon-eating killer whales. But their survival requires your voice and action….

Protecting killer whales →

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores

A wolf hunkers down and watches outwardly in a rock outcropping and their colour is remarkably similar.

Working with our Coastal First Nations partners, our goal is to acquire all remaining commercial hunting tenures in the Great Bear Rainforest. You can help us stop the killing…

Safeguard Coastal Carnivores →

Oil-Free Coast

view of the calm ocean and sunrise at Hakai rocks

Raincoast’s court case argues that federal approval of TransMountain’s oil tankers violates Canada’s Species at Risk Act and pushes Southern Resident killer whales closer to extinction.

Oil-Free Coast →

Fraser River Estuary Project

A Raincoaster dips a science looking thingy into the Lower Fraser River to test for something. Because science.

To understand, mitigate, and reduce habitat impacts from industrial proposals, Raincoast and its partners seek a better understanding of estuary use by different species of wild juvenile salmon.

Fraser River Estuary Project →

Flagship Projects

Wolves splash around in an intertidal zone of the Great Bear Rainforest

Through directed conservation efforts on umbrella and foundation species, Raincoast strives to protect all species and ecosystem processes existing on BC’s coast.

Flagship Projects →

Latest News

Southern Resident killer whale, J50, looking emaciated in the Salish Sea.

Cabinet rejects request for an emergency order for endangered killer whales

Last week the Canadian federal government announced its refusal to issue an emergency order to protect endangered Southern Resident killer whales under the Species at Risk Act, despite the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans’ recommendation to do so. Misty MacDuffee joined Adam Stirling on CFAX 1070 on Monday, November 5th to discuss these measures…

The Sitka donation-o-meter is at $313,000!

Update: closing in on securing the Nadeea tenure

We now have bids on a number of pieces and we’ve sold limited editions prints. Thanks to numerous donations, large and small, we have now raised $313,182…

One Shot for Coastal Carnivores comes to the Robert Bateman Centre in Victoria in November.

Join Raincoast in Victoria to view this unique exhibit and help us stop commercial trophy hunting

The Bateman Centre will serve as a backdrop for this unique photography collection with contributions from April Bencze, Tavish Campbell, Karen Cooper, Colleen Gara, Bertie Gregory, Melissa Groo, Brad Hill, John Marriott, Cristina Mittermeier…

A Grizzly bear looms close up in the background - The Collective logo in the foreground.

Coastal carnivore conservation in the Pacific Northwest – The Collective, Seattle

Proceeds from the event will help secure a fourth commercial trophy hunting tenure, the Nadeaa tenure, that will add protection in the Great Bear Rainforest…

Women in Conservation, One Shot for Coastal Carnivores.

A night to celebrate women in conservation

Join us at the Robert Bateman Centre to learn from, engage and celebrate female Indigenous partners, scientists, journalists, business owners, and philanthropists supporting conservation efforts to safeguard coastal carnivores of British Columbia…


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Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

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