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Ecology and Evolution: Functional response of wolves to human development across boreal North America

Four wolves walk up a hill following a narrow path, research maps superimposed on top.

Previous research on how wolves are affected by human development have been limited in scope and location and the results were mixed. Wolves adapted in a range of ways depending on contextual factors like road or cutblock density. Research undertaken by a team of conservation scientists, including Paul Paquet of Raincoast Conservation Foundation, endeavoured to […]

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We are headed to the Supreme Court for Southern Resident killer whales

Southern Resident killer whales on the surface of the blue Salish Sea.

Today, Raincoast takes our work to protect Southern Resident killer whales from the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. Working with Living Oceans Society and our legal team at Ecojustice, we have filed an application for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court. We are arguing that the […]

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Trans Mountain Expansion project background

J50 and J42, Southern Resident Killer Whales swim in the Salish Sea.

Ecojustice, Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society have worked through the courts to protect Southern Resident killer whales from the threats posed by the Trans Mountain Expansion project.  Timeline 2013 – Raincoast and Living Oceans, legally represented by Ecojustice, file as formal intervenors in the National Energy Board’s review of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain […]

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Gvukva’áus Haíɫzaqv. House of the Haíɫzaqv, it’s always been here

The Haíɫzaqv (Heiltsuk) community of Waglisla (Bella Bella) who have been our friends, supporters and partners for over a generation, were about to celebrate the historic opening of the stunning new Gvukva’áus Haíɫzaqv (house of the Haíɫzaqv) with a five day potlatch celebration. Over 3000 people were expected. Knowing that accommodations were limited in the […]

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Where bears, fish, and humans roam

A bear stands or floats in the water eating a giant salmon.

Transitioning between seasons can often push your senses to work overtime. This is especially true in summer and autumn in the Atnarko River corridor, where the river comes alive with Chinook, chum, pink, sockeye, and coho salmon runs. The smell of a river containing spawned-out fish is unforgettable, and one I have grown fond of. […]

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Searching for sentinels at the top of the world

Mountain goat blending in with rocks and moss on the BC west coast.

White on white is hard to see. It is especially difficult when what’s white is a mountain goat tucked into the nooks and crannies at the top of a mountain. These elusive animals cling to the windswept peaks of the coastal mountains of British Columbia where they find relief from warm summer temperatures and the […]

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Stories from the Magic Canoe, Victoria on November 21st

Stories From the Magic Canoe of Wa'xaid, by Cecil Paul.

This November we are inviting you to an evening conversation with author Briony Penn, Raincoast’s Brian Falconer, and photographer Alex Harris, hosted by CBC’s Bob McDonald. They’ll share stories about one of North America’s most important Indigenous leaders, Wa’xaid, Cecil Paul and the watershed he helped protect. Find this event on Facebook. November 21st, UVic […]

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Evidence, values, policy, and the advance of science

A rhinoceros and juvenile rhinoceros stand in the brown grass of the Botswana flats.

Last month, a group of scientists published a letter in the journal Science that advocated for trophy hunting, arguing that the practice can help safeguard biodiversity. In today’s issue of Science, there are six response letters, and Raincoast scientists (Drs. Kyle Artelle, Chris Darimont and Paul Paquet), contribute to three.  Our team argues that there […]

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