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Ecological legacy of coastal B.C. hangs in the balance

A Humpback whale fin is visible above the surface of the ocean.

One hundred years ago, whaling largely extirpated humpback and fin whales from the inside waters of the B.C. coast. As the federal government looks to codify a 35-year moratorium on oil-tanker traffic into law, these whale populations are recovering and returning to their historic feeding grounds…

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Back to the Kitlope

Cecil Paul and Brian Falconer sit on a river bank speaking about the Kitlope.

While Kitlope is protected from logging, and the current ban protects grizzly bears from hunting, there remains unfinished business in the Kitlope. Until now, commercial guides have been bringing trophy hunters into this place…

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Canada’s recovery measures for endangered killer whales a positive step

J16 spy hops: Southern Resident killer whale.

A coalition of six conservation groups commend the federal government’s new measures to support Southern Resident killer whale recovery. The measures are the boldest yet; greater whale-watching restrictions, expanded voluntary slow downs for international shipping and the creation of no-vessel zones in feeding areas.  However, important feeding areas protected from fishing are smaller than last year’s areas, allowing less protection for whales and more areas for fishing…

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Humpback whales, artistic cartography, for the coast

Forest and Humpbacks drawn over a map of the Hecate Strait.

Watching these magnificent creatures work in unison to catch their meal was truly inspirational and became the idea behind my first Artistic Cartography piece for Raincoast. Listening to them, via the hydrophone that Captain Nick dropped over the side, still makes the hair on the back of neck stand on end and solidified the artistic idea that this hunting method had to be painted…

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No half measures for Southern Resident killer whales

A single Southern Resident killer whale surfaces in the Salish Sea.

Right now, as we anticipate the return of these endangered whales to the Salish Sea, the federal government is considering exactly what measures they will take to aid recovery in 2019. They are asking you for your input, and it is critical that you encourage them to make the right choice. Many voices are advocating for less ambitious recovery actions…

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The future of applied conservation science is bright

A group of scientists and students converge after Christina Service's dissertation defence.

This has been a time of remarkable accomplishment for the Raincoast Applied Conservation Science Lab at the University of Victoria. The research that the lab produces is a dynamic mix of population analyses, biogeography, marine-terrestrial interactions and much more, all rooted in a ‘wildlife welfare’ ethic. Collaboration with Indigenous communities forms the hallmark of much of this work, which is being directly applied…

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Research: Publication reform to safeguard wildlife from researcher harm

A wolf rests on the beach in the Great Bear Rainforest, with a chart from Figure 1 overlaid.

Scientists from Raincoast Conservation Foundation, University of Victoria, Alpha Wildlife Research & Management, and University of Saskatchewan reviewed more than 200 peer-reviewed academic journals that commonly publish wildlife research, evaluating the presence and comprehensiveness of ‘Animal Care’ requirements of authors. The study, “Publication reform to safeguard wildlife from researcher harm,” published as an open access article…

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