Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Published Scientific Literature

Raincoast is a team of scientists and conservationists that undertake primary research and publishes peer-reviewed science to inform our conservation objectives. As an evidence-based, conservation science organisation (science ENGO), that operates a research lab, research field station and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada.

A map of disease vectors is overlayed on a photo of a Norwegian Fjord, with a headline at the bottom: Hypermobile human predators.

Raincoast’s in-house scientists, collaborating graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors make us unique among conservation groups. We work with First Nations, academic institutions, government and other NGOs to gather information and build support for decisions that protect marine and terrestrial ecosystems, their components and processes. We conduct applied, process-oriented, and hypothesis-driven research that has immediate and relevant utility for the conservation debate and the collective body of scientific knowledge.

Our 2012 PLoS paper uses grizzlies to assess harvest impacts of sockeye fisheries. It’s an example of how ecosystem objectives can be considered in salmon management.
On ensuring animal welfare in research using live capture

On ensuring animal welfare in research using live capture

October 26, 20215 min read
A recent journal article, published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution, draws attention to the need for consistent and high standards for animal welfare in research, and the important role that journals have in maintaining ethical standards in published research. The authors, joined by Raincoast scientists Kate Field, Paul Paquet and Chris Darimont, stress that…
New research shows the influence of salmon abundance on the movement of bald eagles

New research shows the influence of salmon abundance on the movement of bald eagles

September 13, 20214 min read
The effect of salmon carcass availability on eagle distribution across multiple rivers was previously not well understood.
They’re everywhere: research finds polyester fibres throughout the Arctic Ocean

They’re everywhere: research finds polyester fibres throughout the Arctic Ocean

August 31, 20216 min read
The presence of microplastics raises concerns that textiles, laundry and municipal wastewater may be an important source of these emerging pollutants.
Quantifying lost habitat for Pacific salmon in the Lower Fraser

Quantifying lost habitat for Pacific salmon in the Lower Fraser

August 12, 20215 min read
Salmon have lost access to as much as 85 per cent of their historical floodplain habitat – the biologically rich wetlands next to a river or stream that typically harbour wildlife – due to dikes and similar infrastructure.