Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Published Scientific Literature

Raincoast is a team of scientists and conservationists that undertake primary research and publishes peer-reviewed science to inform our conservation objectives. As an evidence-based, conservation science organisation (science ENGO), that operates a research lab, research field station and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada.

A map of disease vectors is overlayed on a photo of a Norwegian Fjord, with a headline at the bottom: Hypermobile human predators.

Raincoast’s in-house scientists, collaborating graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors make us unique among conservation groups. We work with First Nations, academic institutions, government and other NGOs to gather information and build support for decisions that protect marine and terrestrial ecosystems, their components and processes. We conduct applied, process-oriented, and hypothesis-driven research that has immediate and relevant utility for the conservation debate and the collective body of scientific knowledge.

Grizzly bear science article cover.
Our 2012 PLoS paper uses grizzlies to assess harvest impacts of sockeye fisheries. It’s an example of how ecosystem objectives can be considered in salmon management.
Bold, sustained action can revitalize wild Pacific salmon in the lower Fraser River

Bold, sustained action can revitalize wild Pacific salmon in the lower Fraser River

Aug 4, 20227 min read
New research shows that Wild Salmon populations in the Fraser can recover if action is taken now.
New research on ecotypes clarifies how they can illuminate our understanding of adaptation and evolution

New research on ecotypes clarifies how they can illuminate our understanding of adaptation and evolution

Jul 21, 20225 min read
This article systematically reviews the literature on ecotype designations and reflects on recent advances in genetic science to show that genetic analyses can provide concrete evidence for the designation of ecotypes, which has implications for conservation decision making.
Vanishing goats? Not on the watch of the Kitasoo Xai’xais Nation

Vanishing goats? Not on the watch of the Kitasoo Xai’xais Nation

Apr 7, 20228 min read
The first signs happened decades ago. KXN community members began to report a decline in sightings of goats once frequently seen from river valleys and the ocean. These patterns were alarming, given the immense cultural value of goats to the Kitasoo Xai’xais people.
Contributions of Indigenous Knowledge to ecological and evolutionary understanding

Contributions of Indigenous Knowledge to ecological and evolutionary understanding

Apr 1, 20225 min read
New research synthesizes the many contributions of Indigenous knowledge and its importance as a distinct but complementary way of knowing to Western science.