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Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Published Scientific Literature

Raincoast is a team of scientists and conservationists that undertake primary research and publishes peer-reviewed science to inform our conservation objectives. As an evidence-based, conservation science organisation (science ENGO), that operates a research lab, research field station and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada.

Raincoast’s in-house scientists, collaborating graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors make us unique among conservation groups. We work with First Nations, academic institutions, government and other NGOs to gather information and build support for decisions that protect marine and terrestrial ecosystems, their components and processes. We conduct applied, process-oriented, and hypothesis-driven research that has immediate and relevant utility for the conservation debate and the collective body of scientific knowledge.

Publication Summary to 2014

Our 2012 PLoS paper uses grizzlies to assess harvest impacts of sockeye fisheries. It’s an example of how ecosystem objectives can be considered in salmon management.

Recent Papers

Achievement is the kind of satisfaction that is most prominent for hunters.

Research: online hunting forums identify achievement as prominent among multiple satisfactions

Researchers from the Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the University of Victoria have shed new light on what satisfies hunters. Reporting in the peer-reviewed journal Wildlife Society Bulletin, they found that the dominant satisfaction expressed in online hunting stories is achievement…

Figures from a research paper an assessing conservation progress in British Columbia

Canada’s Wild Salmon Policy: an assessment of conservation progress in British Columbia

This paper, co-authored by two Raincoast biologists, finds that Canada’s Wild Salmon Policy has failed to improve the conservation of Pacific salmon since its adoption in 2005…

An assortment of figures from the paper, Quantifying marine mammal hotspots in British Columbia, Canada

Research paper maps density patterns and hotspots of BC marine mammals

Building on Raincoast’s five years spent surveying marine mammals on the BC coast, a new approach to linking environmental conditions with marine mammal densities has identified hotspots of marine mammal biodiversity…

Whales eating close to the shore on the North Coast of the Great Bear Rainforest.

Oil Spills and marine mammals: development and application of a risk-based conceptual framework

Using BC as a case study, this paper develops a framework for examining risk to oil spills faced by marine mammals. We found that in BC, killer whales (residents and transients), sea otters, and Steller sea lions face the greatest risk of population level consequences, but that many BC marine mammals are at elevated risk…

A bear in Mussel Inlet.

New dietary study reveals salmon hotspots for grizzly and black bears across 700,000 square kilometres

This study represents a decade of work covering an area reaching 1000km into BC and provides resource managers – Indigenous and Western alike – with dietary information from hundreds of bears across thousands of square kilometres, shedding light on the ecological interconnections of ecology in the expansive bear-salmon-human system…

Coastal bird populations and Big Oil

Times Colonist: Raincoast studies helped put nails in the coffin of the Northern Gateway pipeline. Excerpt for the book “At sea with the marine birds of the Raincoast by Dr. Caroline Fox…

3 trophy hunters kneel behind a dead grizzly.

Hunting for status: men trophy hunt as a signal they can absorb the costs

Just days before the controversial trophy hunt of grizzly bears resumes in BC on April 01, science offers new insight into the human super predator…

Marine birds and chronic oil pollution on Canada’s Pacific coast

Chronic oil pollution is a serious issue in BC. More oil enters the global marine environment from low-level human activities than catastrophic oil spills. Evidence also suggests that these chronic level spills collectively kill more birds than catastrophic spills…

The ecology of conflict

New study from Raincoast and partners finds that when salmon abundance is low, human conflict with bears increases…

A pair of raccoons in the dark sit in a tree.

Fear of large carnivores causes a trophic cascade

Raincoast PhD candidate, Justin Suraci and colleagues publish study from BC’s Gulf Islands on the role of fear in maintaining healthy ecosystems…

Updated marine mammal distribution and abundance estimates for British Columbia

Distribution and abundance estimates from five years (7 seasons) of marine mammal survey in BC’s coastal waters

The human super predator revealed

A study by Raincoast scientists just released in the journal Science identifies humans as the planet’s super predator…

 

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Publications | Scientific Papers | Reports & Books

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