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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Recent articles

Diversity of salmon species a necessary metric to understanding how bears feed

Diversity of salmon species a necessary metric to understanding how bears feed
Salmon biomass is a measure of the total kilograms of spawning salmon. Many who are in the role of implementing conservation strategies and policies think that when it comes to bears, or terrestrial wildlife, more salmon biomass simply means more eating. However, our recent research published…

Panel: the future of killer whale recovery

Panel: the future of killer whale recovery
Through the support of Stream of Consciousness, you can join us on April 18th, either in person or by streaming the event free online. Hosted by CBC’s Bob McDonald, the evening will feature a panel of experts who will be open to questions from the live audience and viewers online.

The National Energy Board and killer whales, on As It Happens

The National Energy Board and killer whales, on As It Happens
In this interview, Misty outlines that while oil spills remain a clear risk, the effects of increased vessel traffic, i.e. noise and disturbance, are a certainty.

Breaking new estuary ground on the Steveston Jetty

Breaking new estuary ground on the Steveston Jetty
When we began our research in the Fraser estuary in 2016, the presence of multiple barriers, including the Steveston Jetty, became a significant concern. With the announcement of the Coastal Restoration Fund in 2017, an opportunity to begin addressing these barriers appeared…

No mitigation measures can protect Southern Resident killer whales from the noise of Trans Mountain’s tanker traffic

No mitigation measures can protect Southern Resident killer whales from the noise of Trans Mountain’s tanker traffic
While we disagree with the NEB’s conclusion, we acknowledge that their review of the effects on killer whales accurately portrays the complexity and severity of the situation.