Habitat restoration: Fraser River Connectivity Project

The Lower Fraser and estuary is a highly modified environment with more than 70% of tidal marsh habitats that juvenile salmon rely on lost or locked away behind manmade structures. On the Fraser delta, this includes the jetties, causeways and training walls that were built to control the arms of the river for ship navigation. The estuary is now very fragmented by these structures that alter the flow of water, sediment and nutrients. They also restrict the passage of juvenile salmon that want to move onto the shallow tidal salt marshes and eelgrass to feed and grow.

In 2016, Raincoast began a five-year restorationproject to create openings in several of these man-made barriers that prevent the natural migration of juvenile salmon.  The project includes baseline research on juvenile salmon, such as their presence and distribution in different habitats, their size and growth over the season(s) and how long they reside in the estuary. It also includes establishing baseline information on estuarine conditions and salmon movements prior to creating the openings, so that we can evaluate the success of the breaches once they are created.

One of the breaches in the Steveston Jetty
Two grizzly bears looking into the distance while standing in an estuary.

2021: Our impact so far

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We are already halfway through the year, and I wanted to share with you some of Raincoast’s achievements thus far. This progress relies on donors like you and the entire team at Raincoast sincerely appreciates your support. Here’s a snapshot of Raincoast’s efforts over the past six months.
Underwater shot of a Chinook Salmon in the Fraser River

Join us for the last webinar of our Connected Estuary series

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In Episode 6, we will build on this learning with Morgan Guerin, a community member, past Councilor, and Senior Marine Planning Specialist for the Musqueam Nation. Morgan is also an artist who has developed materials for the c̓əsnaʔəm exhibit at the Musqueam Community Cultural Centre and he continues to share his knowledge, expertise and teachings through tool-kits for use in schools and other communities.

Terminal 2 Backgrounder: Impacts to Fraser Chinook salmon

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The Port of Vancouver is proposing to double the size of its shipping terminal at Roberts Bank beside the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal. The existing terminal is already a significant presence in the Fraser estuary. Its 210-acre container terminal connects to the largest coal terminal in North America. A four-kilometre long causeway across the Fraser estuary facilitates truck and rail transit between the terminal and the shore…