Join us for a webinar examining the concept of Two-Eyed Seeing

This week’s Coastal Insights webinar we will be exploring how indigenous knowledge and contemporary science can work together.

Indigenous knowledge has existed and sustained the ecosystems on the coast of British Columbia for millennia. Drawing upon multiple types of knowledge (e.g. Indigenous Knowledge, local-knowledge, science-based knowledge) can strengthen understanding of the past, predict the future of systems, and improve conservation and resource management. 

In this week’s episode of Coastal Insights, join us as we visit with Albert Marshall, the creator of the two-eyed seeing concept, balancing Indigenous knowledge and contemporary science. We will also be joined by Indigenous fisheries scientist, Andrea Jane Reid, as we examine how this concept is being used today.

More about our guests

Albert Marshall is an Elder and Honorary Doctorate of the Mi’kmaq Nation in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.  He is the creator of the “Two Eyed Seeing” concept–Balancing Traditional Aboriginal Knowledge and Contemporary Science. Albert works to further positive work within Mi’kmaw communities, to seek preservation and understanding of cultural beliefs and practices among all communities and to effect a strong vision for his people and the future.
Andrea Jane Reid is the Assistant Professor of Indigenous Fisheries Science at the University of British Columbia’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries. She is an Indigenous fisheries scientist and conservation biologist that adopts an integrative approach to complex fisheries questions.

Coastal Insights: Eyes on the Coast (Season 2)

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