How art will help protect S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest

We have been supported by an incredible community of local artists and we are very grateful for their generosity.

Two painting float in the foreground of an out of focus fern from Flycatcher Forest.

Paintings by Sarah Jim and Morgan Warren. Photo by Alex Harris / Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

The Pender Islands Conservancy had their eye on the property that has now been named S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest, for years prior to Raincoast’s involvement. A longtime resident of North Pender Island (S,DÁYES in SENĆOŦEN ) past president and board member of the Conservancy, Graham Boffey lives just down the road from the 13-acre piece of the globally rare Coastal Douglas-fir ecosystem type. He watched it go on and off the market with trepidation, worried that someone may purchase and fragment this valuable piece of the Shingle Creek watershed and wildlife corridor.

While we hoped that this initiative would align with community interests and thus generate strong local support, we did not anticipate how quick and strong the show of support would be.  Tweet This!

With water licences that would allow up to 1,000 gallons to be pumped daily from the wetland, he also worried for the local watershed that supplies the majority of the Island’s residents with drinking water.

When Raincoast learned of the Conservancy’s interest, each of our organizations recognized the skill set the other could bring to a collaborative initiative to purchase and protect the property. So together, we launched a campaign to safeguard S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest

While we hoped that this initiative would align with community interests and thus generate strong local support, we did not anticipate how quick and strong the show of support would be. Supporters have included local government representatives, small business owners, current and former residents of the Gulf Islands, neighbours, family members, and charitable foundations.

It has also included artists. Because of this showing of generosity we were able to raise the funds required to purchase and permanently protect S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest three months into our six-month campaign.

We are incredibly grateful to every person who transformed this initiative from the hopes of one person into reality, and because we cannot thank each of you individually, we wanted to recognize a few of the artists who have donated their time and talent to the permanent protection of local ecosystems. 

Entrance Island Lighthouse painting, by Lawrie Dignan.
Entrance island lighthouse, by Lawrie Dignan.

Our gratitude to

Sarah Jim

Sarah Jim, W̱SÁNEĆ community member, Coast Salish artist, and environmental restorationist, who not only contributed art in financial support of our campaign, but also gave of her time and knowledge in our video tour of S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest and our video announcing that we met our fundraising goal. 

Mae Moore

Mae Moore, painter, singer/songwriter, and resident of Pender Island whose art piece “Estuary at Kynoch Inlet” was donated to Raincoast as part of a separate campaign, but was also used for this year’s art card in recognition of our new forest protection undertakings. 

Morgan Warren

Morgan Warren, watercolor artist and resident of Pender Island who donated two pieces to the  S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest campaign. These framed original pieces are illustrations from her last book, “Nature on the Threshold”. They are currently available for purchase at the Pender Islands Conservancy’s Nature Centre at Hope Bay on Pender Island. All proceeds will be used toward the ongoing management of S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest. 

Lawrie Dignan

Lawrie Dignan, Pen and ink artist and resident of Pender Island who donated an original drawing to S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest campaign. This piece can be viewed at the Pender Islands Conservancy’s Nature Centre at Hope Bay on Pender Island. It is being sold to the highest offer with all proceeds being donated to the ongoing management of S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest. To make a bid visit the Nature Centre.

Follow up questions

If you questions or are interested in supporting this project, please contact Shauna Doll.

Shauna Doll, Gulf Islands Forest Project Coordinator, Raincoast

Shauna Doll, smiles while standing outside in the snow.

Shauna Doll, Gulf Islands Forest Project Coordinator

Shauna Doll completed her Master’s degree at Dalhousie and has worked in forest conservation in Nova Scotia in the context of climate change. She is the Lead Researcher on the Raincoast Gulf Islands Forest Project. You can find her in the lab, or in the forests of the Gulf Islands.