Spirits of the Coast – live event

An evening about killer whales, bringing together four contributors and diverse perspectives from the book, Spirits of the Coast.

Jess Housty, Misty MacDuffee and others on a panel about the book, Spirits of the Coast.

Photo by Andy Wright.

Join us for an online panel discussion bringing together contributors from the book, Spirits of the Coast from the Royal BC Museum. Hear from Jess Housty, Nikki Iyolo Sanchez, Misty MacDuffee and Eric Mazimpaka, as they discuss the cultural and ecological importance of killer whales.

In light of the Supreme Court of Canada declining to hear from a group of First Nations about the federal government’s second approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project on Thursday, as well as Raincoast’s arguments on the laws protecting Southern Resident killer whales earlier this year, this discussion comes at a crucial time.

At a time when we should be doing everything possible to reduce the threats to these whales and furthering their recovery, approving the Trans Mountain project takes this in the opposite direction. It increases these threats, and increases their likelihood of extinction.

This was a free event, but your donations empower everything we do!

July 22nd at 6pm to 8pm
Online panel presentation and discussion

Jess Housty is a citizen of the Heiltsuk Nation.

Jess Housty is a citizen of the Haíɫzaqv Nation. She works in service of community in both governance and grassroots capacities. She is an activist, a plant worker and an advocate for land-based learning and healing.

Nikki Iyolo Sanchez is a Pipil/Maya and Irish/Scottish academic.

Nikki Iyolo Sanchez is a Pipil/Maya and Irish/Scottish academic, Indigenous media maker and environmental educator and co-editor of the book. She holds a masters degree in Indigenous governance and is presently completing a PhD with a research focus on emerging visual media technology as it relates to Indigenous ontology.

Eric Mazimpaka is an artist from Nairobi, Kenya.

Eric Mazimpaka is an artist from Nairobi, Kenya. At present, he resides in Vancouver, BC. His artwork interfaces with the rich history of East African art by assimilating its styles and mediums.

Misty MacDuffee is a biologist and Wild Salmon Program Director

Misty MacDuffee is a biologist and Wild Salmon Program Director at Raincoast. She has worked on salmon conservation and management for the past 15 years.

July 22nd at 6pm to 8pm

The evening will be hosted by Raincoast Communications Associate and Storyteller, Alex Harris.

We look forward to having you along on this important discussion.