skip to main content

Southern Resident killer whales are on the precipice

The federal government recently announced its refusal to issue an emergency order, despite the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans’ recommendation to do so. Although we commend the ministers for recommending an emergency order be used, we are deeply disappointed that Cabinet rejected what we believe to be the best available tool to recover these whales…

Read more

From meerkats to killer whales

A family of meerkats stand together watching, while a young member opens their mouth and shows their tongue.

For animal species that form social groups, living together can have a strong effect on individuals’ chances of survival and reproduction, and ultimately on how population sizes change over time. New work, led by myself in collaboration with a team of researchers from Canada, the UK, and Switzerland, combines theory and data to shed light […]

Read more

Fisheries closures needed for killer whales

J50 swims toward San Juan Island: a group of people stand by the lighthouse waiting and watching.

The Southern Resident killer whale population needs your voice to demand that the new federal Fisheries Minister, Jonathan Wilkinson, issue an emergency order that also includes the following actions…

Read more

A killer whale emergency

Southern Resident killer whales swim side by side, as seen from the air.

We are requesting an emergency order under Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Southern Resident killer whales were recognized as endangered in 2002. Despite this, the Federal Government has taken no action to date to reduce the threats to these whales…

Read more

Action for killer whales cannot be delayed

Two southern resident killer whales approach in the Salish Sea.

The Salish Sea’s Southern Resident killer whale population is one of the most critically endangered populations of marine mammals in Canada and the U.S. Both countries list this transboundary population as endangered, citing three primary risk factors…

Read more

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Publications | Scientific Papers | Reports & Books

Find us & follow

You can help Save the Great Bears: find out how