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Chinook salmon exhibit long-term rearing and early marine growth in the Fraser River, B.C., a large urban estuary

A tiny juvenile Chinook salmon in a viewfinder in the Lower Fraser River.

Using tiny salmon ear bones, or otoliths, Raincoast researchers and partners were able to demonstrate that Chinook salmon from Harrison River rely on the Fraser estuary for one to two months while they feed and grow. These findings underscore the critical nature of this habitat for the persistence and recovery of Chinook salmon…

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Research: Compliance of small vessels to minimum distance regulations for humpback and killer whales in the Salish Sea

A Southern Resident killer whale fin above the water in the Salish Sea with graphs from a research paper in the foreground.

The rise of vessel traffic, the growth of the whale watching industry, increased interactions between whales and small vessels, and the precarious existence of Southern Residents in particular, has given rise to some regulations from the federal government that attempt to mitigate the harm these interactions pose…

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Wolf School with Chris Darimont

Wolf School with Chris Darimont.

The last episode of this “semester’s” Wolf School looks toward existing and emerging solutions to the conservation of wolves in British Columbia. Raincoast’s Director of Science, Dr. Chris Darimont, will also look back to share how his mentor, Chester “Lone Wolf” Starr, influenced him, all of our wolf research and the direction of Raincoast’s conservation work on BC’s coast…

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Connecting the invisible to the visible

A black bear forages in the estuary with the tide out.

As modern scientists, we frequently deal in abstraction. We are separated from the species and ecosystems we study often by hundreds of miles, bureaucratic bubbles, cloistered campuses, and the machinations of innumerable statistical analyses whirring silently away in the electric flatness…

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Where bears, fish, and humans roam

A bear stands or floats in the water eating a giant salmon.

Transitioning between seasons can often push your senses to work overtime. This is especially true in summer and autumn in the Atnarko River corridor, where the river comes alive with Chinook, chum, pink, sockeye, and coho salmon runs. The smell of a river containing spawned-out fish is unforgettable, and one I have grown fond of. […]

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Searching for sentinels at the top of the world

Mountain goat blending in with rocks and moss on the BC west coast.

White on white is hard to see. It is especially difficult when what’s white is a mountain goat tucked into the nooks and crannies at the top of a mountain. These elusive animals cling to the windswept peaks of the coastal mountains of British Columbia where they find relief from warm summer temperatures and the […]

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