skip to main content

Where bears, fish, and humans roam

A bear stands or floats in the water eating a giant salmon.

Transitioning between seasons can often push your senses to work overtime. This is especially true in summer and autumn in the Atnarko River corridor, where the river comes alive with Chinook, chum, pink, sockeye, and coho salmon runs. The smell of a river containing spawned-out fish is unforgettable, and one I have grown fond of. […]

Read more

Searching for sentinels at the top of the world

Mountain goat blending in with rocks and moss on the BC west coast.

White on white is hard to see. It is especially difficult when what’s white is a mountain goat tucked into the nooks and crannies at the top of a mountain. These elusive animals cling to the windswept peaks of the coastal mountains of British Columbia where they find relief from warm summer temperatures and the […]

Read more

Research: Trophy hunters pay more to target larger-bodied carnivores

A polar bear rolls on their back with their mouth open, and there's a graph floating in the top right.

The behaviour of human hunters diverges from other animals. Other predators tend to target vulnerable individuals in prey populations. Humans, often males, tend to hunt large, reproductive-aged individuals. In the case of guided trophy hunting these species are likely perceived as costly, by increasing failure risk and risk of injury, and providing lower nutritional returns.

Read more

Research: Publication reform to safeguard wildlife from researcher harm

A wolf rests on the beach in the Great Bear Rainforest, with a chart from Figure 1 overlaid.

Scientists from Raincoast Conservation Foundation, University of Victoria, Alpha Wildlife Research & Management, and University of Saskatchewan reviewed more than 200 peer-reviewed academic journals that commonly publish wildlife research, evaluating the presence and comprehensiveness of ‘Animal Care’ requirements of authors. The study, “Publication reform to safeguard wildlife from researcher harm,” published as an open access article…

Read more

Advancing non-invasive approaches for monitoring wildlife: considering the ethics of developing new techniques

Hair samples in the field of bears.

A theme that underlies our research in the Applied Conservation Lab is that we aim to apply methods that are minimally invasive to wildlife. This ethos emerges in large part from our partners in First Nations communities, who have taught us many important lessons about respecting the people, places, and animals where we work. Our […]

Read more

Meet the team of applied conservation scientists at the University of Victoria

Chris Darimont looking off into the distance on the river with the sun coming through trees in the background.

Last year the Raincoast lab at UVic marked an important new milestone with the creation of the Raincoast Chair in Applied Conservation Science at the University of Victoria. This five year Chaired Professorship allows us to expand our research, teaching and outreach programs in community-driven applied conservation science. Our long-term vision is to train next […]

Read more

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Publications | Scientific Papers | Reports & Books

Find us & follow