Confronting the elephant (head) in the room – researchers challenge the conservation community on the ethics of trophy hunting

Confronting the elephant (head) in the room – researchers challenge the conservation community on the ethics of trophy hunting

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists is challenging the conservation community to fully consider the ethics of trophy hunting and think critically about endorsing the practice as a key funding mechanism for wildlife protection. Read our new paper, “The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy…

Conservation Letters: The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy hunting

Conservation Letters: The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy hunting

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists argue that trophy hunting – hunting that involves the collection of animal body parts, or “trophies,” – is morally wrong. Led by Chelsea Batavia from the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, the authors identify trophy hunting as…

On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

For years, British Columbia’s wildlife management practices, especially its wolf cull and grizzly bear hunt, have been controversial. In 2015, then-Premier Christy Clark defended the province’s wildlife policies, stating they were grounded in sound science. That, at least, was the claim. And not one unique to British Columbia. In fact, hunting in Canada and the…