Measurable results

Raincoast’s unique blend of science, practice and community engagement offers us a chance to re-imagine conservation pathways in BC.

As someone who has pursued a life-long journey as an environmental scientist, I find myself wondering whether today’s ‘science to policy’ paradigm is sufficient to safeguard British Columbia from the ravages of climate change and the loss of biodiversity.

As the fragility of our civilization is laid bare by droughts, floods, wildfires, and rising seas in 2021, my appetite for more cohesive and concrete action has increased, as it becomes apparent that the status quo no longer suffices.

And so I find myself on the doorsteps of Raincoast Conservation Foundation, an organization that epitomizes the journey from conservation dreams to reality. Raincoast has broken the mould for environmental sector non-profits by conducting and publishing rigorous peer-reviewed science in ways that inform conservation policy and practice.

With a staff of dynamic scientists, and an applied conservation science lab at the University of Victoria, this scientific capacity provides the foundation for Raincoast’s work. On top of hard-hitting research, Raincoast delivers real-world solutions with tangible conservation outcomes. From large-scale salmon habitat restoration in the Lower Fraser River to purchasing commercial trophy hunting tenures throughout the Great Bear Rainforest to land acquisition in the endangered Coastal Douglas-fir zone, Raincoast’s entrepreneurial approach generates measurable results.

Raincoast’s unique blend of science, practice and community engagement offers us a chance to re-imagine conservation pathways in BC. I look forward to rolling out our new Healthy Waters program, a community-oriented water pollution monitoring initiative that will provide a unique opportunity to highlight the shared value of water to salmon, whales, and people.

Our annual report is out now!

Get highlights from the year, our science, flagship projects, staff and volunteers, as well as a peek at what’s in store for the coming year.

Research scientist, Adam Warner conducting genetics research in our genetics lab.
Photo by Alex Harris / Raincoast Conservation Foundation.