Roy Henry Vickers prints support ‘salvation fish project’

Picture Perfect Gallery and Hemp & Company provide additional support to those wanting to purchase a print

Artist Roy Henry Vickers donated 20 prints of his remarkable painting Mother Earth, to support scientific research and a photo expose of the forage fish (oolichan) in the Skeena Estuary.  These tiny fish and the estuary habitat they rely on are the basis for an incredible web of life that supports cultures, ecosystems and economies of the Skeena region.

The prints are available for purchase online from the Raincoast Gallery at $800 plus shipping.  Prints are also available from Village Gallery (Sidney), Eagle Aerie Gallery (Tofino) and the Eagle Feather Gallery (Victoria). Purchasers wishing to have their print framed should contact the Morris Gallery in Victoria. All proceeds support the Forage Fish research initiative.

The Skeena Estuary is the proposed site for numerous LNG terminal and tanker proposals. Based on a photograph by Paul Colangelo a National Geographic Explorer and member of the International League of Conservation Photographers, Vickers expresses that “the moose cow and calf are indicative of Canada’s wilderness. The blue skies always remind me of fresh air and the water, well we all need water, cool, clear, and clean water to sustain us.”

Raincoast is also pleased to offer a special edition set of prints that includes Roy Henry Vickers’ Mother Earth and the photograph by Paul Colangelo that inspired it. These images capture the Skeena Headwaters and are iconic of Canada’s wilderness. This matching set of prints, both sized 17″ x 27″, is a unique opportunity to showcase the collaboration of these two artists. Please contact Raincoast for pricing. Again, custom framing for the set is available from Morris Gallery.

Raincoast Conservation Foundation is grateful to all involved for supporting this initiative, and for their sponsorship.

Related Post

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Publications | Scientific Papers | Reports & Books

Find us & follow

You can help Save the Great Bears: find out how