Maureen Vo, Education Director

Maureen joined the Raincoast team in 2016 to help pilot the Salish Sea Emerging Stewards program. She continues to develop and deliver the education program and additionally supports the development team.

As a proud BC resident, Maureen grew up exploring and enjoying the natural playground around her through hiking, kayaking, snowboarding, rock-climbing, and now sailing. Her passion for educating and connecting people to nature, led her to organize the annual Stepping into Nature Festival at Burns Bog, which educates over 400 students per year with hands-on nature education. She has worked with environmental conservation organizations throughout the coast of BC to help people recognize the incredible biodiversity of BC’s coastal environment, as well as understand the many threats and challenges it faces.

She is excited to be a part of the Raincoast team to inspire more people to connect, respect and protect nature. Maureen holds an interdisciplinary Master’s in marine biology and computer engineering.

You can join us and support the Salish Sea Emerging Stewards program.

Maureen Vo stands on the bow of a small sailing vessel in the coastal waters of British Columbia.
Maureen Vo, Education and Development Coordinator
A giant ancient stump stands in the foreground and a barren cutblock lies behind it.

No comprehensive strategy to protect ancient forests in BC

Shauna Doll, Raincoast Gulf Islands Forest Project Coordinator, submitted a letter to The Honourable Katrine Conroy, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (FLNRO), and The Honourable Nathan Cullen, Minister of State for Lands and Natural Resource Operations on March 30th.
Two painting float in the foreground of an out of focus fern from Flycatcher Forest.

How art will help protect S,DÁYES Flycatcher Forest

We are incredibly grateful to every person who transformed this initiative from the hopes of one person into reality, and because we cannot thank each of you individually, we wanted to recognize a few of the artists who have donated their time and talent to the permanent protection of local ecosystems.
Close up photo of a cedar bough.

BC’s Coastal Douglas-fir zone needs protection now

In an era where climate change is a modern reality and biodiversity is in crisis the world over, the province’s continued support of industrial logging in old growth forests is out of sync with global scientific consensus and policy objectives. This is especially true in the Coastal Douglas-fir (CDF) biogeoclimactic zone, the smallest and most endangered of 16 such zones in BC…