Oil spill simulation gets locals talking about possibility of crude along the Salish Sea

Vancouver Observer

Jenny Uechi  Aug 28th, 2014

Vancouver-based artist Tamara Phillips was out swimming with her partner near Stanley Park sea on a hot, sunny Wednesday, when her eye caught a glimpse of a yellow card, floating along the water’s surface.

The card was stamped with the text “This could be oil”, drawing attention to the potential consequence of an oil spill on the coast. Hundreds of cards were dropped along the Fraser River and Burrard Inlet area on Tuesday by members of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation to simulate how oil would disperse in the event of a spill.

The experiment is timely ahead of NEB hearings for the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would increase the number of tankers to Burnaby five-fold to over 400 oil tankers a year…

To read the full article please visit the Vancouver Observer website.

To celebrate the end of the year, we are so happy to be able to offer matching campaigns on two of our most pressing fundraising initiatives.

All donations to both the Southern Great Bear Rainforest tenure acquisition and our KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest initiative, will be matched until the end of the year. This is a great opportunity for our supporters, like you, to make your impact go twice as far, while benefiting from tax deductions.

Help us secure KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest on S,DÁYES (Pender Island). Together with Pender Islands Conservancy, Raincoast is raising $2.18 million to purchase a 45 acre coastal property on the edge of the Salish Sea.

Safeguarding Coastal Carnivores in the Southern Great Bear Rainforest tenure. We are currently raising funds to stop commercial trophy hunting in more than a quarter of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia.