Fearsome deer hunters? No, wolves would rather dine on a dainty fish dish

By Daily Mail Reporter September 2, 2008 Wolves have a reputation as fearsome meat-eating hunters, but given the choice they would rather have a tasty salmon, scientists have found. This is because a leisurely fishing trip is safer and less exhausting than chasing deer. Salmon also provides an excellent source of nutrition.

British Columbia wolves have taste for salmon, new study finds

Financial Post Canwest News Service Published: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 A team of biologists has discovered “Canada’s newest marine mammal” — the wolf. A new Canadian study of the feeding patterns of British Columbia wolf packs found that they would rather fish than hunt. The study found that wolves routinely turn up their noses at…

Fear and Loathing: Is it better to be a wolf in Canada than the U.S.?

By CHRIS GENOVALI Monday Magazine May 28 2008 Having recently attended the 20th annual North American Wolf Conference in Pray, Montana, it has been particularly dismaying to learn that literally days after the gray wolf was de-listed from the Endangered Species Act in the United States, trophy hunters in Wyoming had already shot numerous wolves.

Notes from the Lab

Notes from the Lab

Biologist Rainforest Wolf ProjectParasitology labUniversity of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon Peering down the eyepiece of my microscope, I scan a slide for larval stages of parasites. I find one that is familiar-a brown, translucent egg of the tapeworm Diphyllobothrium-and begin to count. One, two …. With the Wolf Project crew out of the field, our dedicated lab…

One with the wolves

Monday Magazine By Bill Stuart Feb 27 2008 Chris Darimont goes north to the Great Bear Rainforest No question, wolves have gotten a bad rap through literature and folklore over the years, but in truth they are an essential part of many northern ecosystems. Thanks to the work of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation and scientists…

The influence of natural landscape fragmentation and resource availability on connectivity and distribution of marine gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations on the Central Coast, British Columbia, Canada

Paquet, P.C., S.M. Alexander, P.L. Swan, and C.T. Darimont. 2006. The influence of natural landscape fragmentation and resource availability on connectivity and distribution of marine gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations on the Central Coast, British Columbia, Canada. In Crooks, K. and M.A. Sanjayan (Eds.) Connectivity Conservation. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK. Landscape fragmentation & wolves…