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Otolith study confirms Harrison Chinook salmon rely on the Fraser River Estuary for early growth

A juvenile Chinook salmon is measured in a clear container with water with the estuary in the background.

Chinook salmon from the Harrison River, which was declared Canada’s first Salmon Stronghold, do something unique; rather than growing in their home lake and river system for the first year or more as many other salmon do, these fish go on a great adventure.

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An influx of information

Underwater photo of 4 Salmon smolts.

Lauren Mitchell, intern on Raincoast’s wild salmon team, is researching how to best to go about calculating the number of salmon the Lower Fraser River and estuary are able to support.

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Chinook salmon exhibit long-term rearing and early marine growth in the Fraser River, B.C., a large urban estuary

A tiny juvenile Chinook salmon in a viewfinder in the Lower Fraser River.

Using tiny salmon ear bones, or otoliths, Raincoast researchers and partners were able to demonstrate that Chinook salmon from Harrison River rely on the Fraser estuary for one to two months while they feed and grow. These findings underscore the critical nature of this habitat for the persistence and recovery of Chinook salmon…

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Tracking Raincoast into 2021

The cover of Tracking Raincoast into 2021 over top of a photo of a spirit bear with a salmon in their mouth.

Like everyone else in 2020, we have had to adapt and explore our own resilience. From pausing multi-year field research programs, cancelling youth education and our usual travel throughout the coast, COVID has disrupted much. Yet we are grateful to have our health and play our part in protecting and supporting the communities, businesses, and individuals we work with…

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Research: Conservation in heavily urbanized biodiverse regions requires urgent management action and attention to governance

An infographic about the Fraser Estuary overlayed on top of an underwater photo of some salmon.

A new open access research paper led by Dr. Tara Martin at the UBC Conservation Decisions Lab applied a novel conservation decision making tool called Priority Threat Management to identify the most cost-effective management strategies needed to address the threats facing 102 species at risk identified in the area…

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Federal Minister presses pause on Terminal 2

Misty MacDuffee in the Fraser Estuary

In a six page letter (PDF) to the CEO of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, Canada’s minister of Environment and Climate Change, Jonathan Wilkinson, requested more information from the Port to assess the effectiveness of mitigation efforts in the proposed expansion of Terminal 2 on Roberts Bank. Wikinson’s letter conveyed the panel’s conclusion about likely adverse effects to fish, fish habitat and other at-risk species if Terminal 2 proceeds…

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