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Carbon stewardship workshop focusing on Gulf Islands forests and coasts

Three women standing 6 feet apart talking to each other in a Coastal Douglas-fir forest

Later this month, Raincoast, along with partners, will be hosting a workshop exploring the feasibility of implementing carbon stewardship projects on the Gulf Islands and across the Coastal Douglas-fir (CDF) zone in the Salish Sea. This workshop aims to establish a civic and Indigenous community of learners. Our goal is to collaboratively develop a nature-based climate project financed from conservation, restoration and improved ecosystem management.

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Nature conservation should be central to Canada’s recovery from COVID-19

Cover of the open letter to the PMO standing beside a large elk.

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, PC, MPPrime Minister of CanadaOffice of the Prime Minister and Privy Council Parliament BuildingsOttawa, Ontario K1A 1A6 July 10, 2020 Dear Prime Minister Trudeau: As organizations with a strong commitment to defending nature in Canada, we want to acknowledge the efforts that the Government of Canada has made to protect […]

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In memory of Dr. Michael Soulé

Paul Paquet and Michael Soule out on the land.

Michael Soulé’s work has been central to the growth of conservation science. He has been called the grandfather of conservation biology. Soulé has been an important source of knowledge, counsel, and insight to many of the scientists at Raincoast Conservation Foundation. May 28, 1936 – June 17, 2020 Thoughtful counsel and generosity My last conversations […]

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Finding communities in salmon conservation

A salmon splashes in a shallow stream, surrounding by the vibrant colours of autumn.

As I crouch on the riverbank taking measurements of the salmon carcass, the ever-telling sensation of being watched creeps up my neck. I look up to see a mother black bear and her two cubs across the river, staring right at me. Our eyes meet, and time slows. In this moment of connected eyes and […]

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Research: Differentiating between regulation and hunting as conservation interventions

A giant pile of bison bones loom over a person standing beside it.

Wildlife conservation literature and public discourse, too often gloss over the important difference between hunting and the regulation of hunting. This is so common that there is a persistent, misinformed idea that extinctions have been avoided through the act of hunting. Historically, the regulation of hunting, not hunting itself, has averted extinction…

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B.C.’s approach to wildlife management needs major ethical reform

A bighorn sheep close up on face and eye.

British Columbia has begun an ambitious effort to review the province’s approach to managing wildlife, with $14 million committed so far. The Province’s interest in reform is encouraging. As explained in a letter we recently published in the journal Science…

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Confronting the elephant (head) in the room – researchers challenge the conservation community on the ethics of trophy hunting

A grizzly bear meanders in the Great Bear rainforest.

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists is challenging the conservation community to fully consider the ethics of trophy hunting and think critically about endorsing the practice as a key funding mechanism for wildlife protection. Read our new paper, “The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy […]

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Conservation Letters: The elephant (head) in the room: A critical look at trophy hunting

A lion head is attached as a trophy to a post overlooking a large expanse of desert, and several University logos on the right hand side.

Writing in the scientific journal, Conservation Letters, an international team of conservation scientists argue that trophy hunting – hunting that involves the collection of animal body parts, or “trophies,” – is morally wrong. Led by Chelsea Batavia from the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, the authors identify trophy hunting as […]

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On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

A bear stands in the distant grass and fog to get a better look or maybe smell.

For years, British Columbia’s wildlife management practices, especially its wolf cull and grizzly bear hunt, have been controversial. In 2015, then-Premier Christy Clark defended the province’s wildlife policies, stating they were grounded in sound science. That, at least, was the claim. And not one unique to British Columbia. In fact, hunting in Canada and the […]

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