Otolith study confirms Harrison Chinook salmon rely on the Fraser River Estuary for early growth

Otolith study confirms Harrison Chinook salmon rely on the Fraser River Estuary for early growth

Chinook salmon from the Harrison River, which was declared Canada’s first Salmon Stronghold, do something unique; rather than growing in their home lake and river system for the first year or more as many other salmon do, these fish go on a great adventure.

Chinook salmon exhibit long-term rearing and early marine growth in the Fraser River, B.C., a large urban estuary

Chinook salmon exhibit long-term rearing and early marine growth in the Fraser River, B.C., a large urban estuary

Using tiny salmon ear bones, or otoliths, Raincoast researchers and partners were able to demonstrate that Chinook salmon from Harrison River rely on the Fraser estuary for one to two months while they feed and grow. These findings underscore the critical nature of this habitat for the persistence and recovery of Chinook salmon…

Federal Minister presses pause on Terminal 2

Federal Minister presses pause on Terminal 2

In a six page letter (PDF) to the CEO of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, Canada’s minister of Environment and Climate Change, Jonathan Wilkinson, requested more information from the Port to assess the effectiveness of mitigation efforts in the proposed expansion of Terminal 2 on Roberts Bank. Wikinson’s letter conveyed the panel’s conclusion about likely adverse effects to fish, fish habitat and other at-risk species if Terminal 2 proceeds…

Terminal 2 Backgrounder: Impacts to Fraser Chinook salmon

Terminal 2 Backgrounder: Impacts to Fraser Chinook salmon

The Port of Vancouver is proposing to double the size of its shipping terminal at Roberts Bank beside the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal. The existing terminal is already a significant presence in the Fraser estuary. Its 210-acre container terminal connects to the largest coal terminal in North America. A four-kilometre long causeway across the Fraser estuary facilitates truck and rail transit between the terminal and the shore…

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

Hatcheries have failed to protect or restore the old ages, big sizes, range of migration times and diversity of wild Chinook salmon. For Southern Residents to recover, the age structure and run timing of wild Chinook runs, along with abundance, need to be restored. This is not the objective of hatcheries…

Saving endangered whales: Strategies from above and below the 49th parallel

Saving endangered whales: Strategies from above and below the 49th parallel

On May 10, the Canadian federal government announced its first wide-ranging measures to reduce the primary threats compromising survival of the salmon-eating Southern Resident killer whales reliant on the transboundary waters of the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. Although federally listed as endangered in 2003 in Canada and 2005 in the US, little has happened…