Spatial alignment between grizzly bear genetic groups and Indigenous language families in coastal BC

Spatial alignment between grizzly bear genetic groups and Indigenous language families in coastal BC

In the landscape on the central coast of what is now known as British Columbia, genetic analyses have identified three distinct genetic groups of grizzly bears.  The spatial areas of these groups align strikingly well with the geographies of three Indigenous language families (Tsimshian, Northern Wakashan, Salishan Nuxalk).  The explanation the research partnership favours is…

Recommendations towards greater transparency in the science, science communication, and values-driven processes of natural resource management

Recommendations towards greater transparency in the science, science communication, and values-driven processes of natural resource management

A new paper, published by a team of researchers including Raincoast scientists, dives into the tangle of cognitive bias, institutional agendas, human interests, and pays special attention to the role of undisclosed value judgments.

Research: Compliance of small vessels to minimum distance regulations for humpback and killer whales in the Salish Sea

Research: Compliance of small vessels to minimum distance regulations for humpback and killer whales in the Salish Sea

The rise of vessel traffic, the growth of the whale watching industry, increased interactions between whales and small vessels, and the precarious existence of Southern Residents in particular, has given rise to some regulations from the federal government that attempt to mitigate the harm these interactions pose…

Wolf School with Chris Darimont

Wolf School with Chris Darimont

The last episode of this “semester’s” Wolf School looks toward existing and emerging solutions to the conservation of wolves in British Columbia. Raincoast’s Director of Science, Dr. Chris Darimont, will also look back to share how his mentor, Chester “Lone Wolf” Starr, influenced him, all of our wolf research and the direction of Raincoast’s conservation work on BC’s coast…

Exploring human dimensions of hunting via social science, evolutionary ecology, and personal experience

Exploring human dimensions of hunting via social science, evolutionary ecology, and personal experience

In episode 140 of The Hunting Collective podcast, Ben O’Brien does a fascinating and good-natured follow up interview with Dr. Barrie Gilbert. Dr. Gilbert is a prominent bear biologist, friend of Raincoast, and previous verbal sparring-partner with Ben (at least when it comes to the hunting of predators). Ben invited Dr. Gilbert back for another interview, and they made productive amends…

Research: Addressing poor statistical support for wolf control and maternal penning as conservation measures for endangered mountain caribou

Research: Addressing poor statistical support for wolf control and maternal penning as conservation measures for endangered mountain caribou

The scientists looked closely at the data provided in a previous study that examined how 18 caribou populations responded to different treatments including wolf culls, maternal penning, moose reduction, and combinations thereof, as well as controls. There were important errors in the statistical methods associated with that prior study…

In memory of Dr. Michael Soulé

In memory of Dr. Michael Soulé

Michael Soulé’s work has been central to the growth of conservation science. He has been called the grandfather of conservation biology. Soulé has been an important source of knowledge, counsel, and insight to many of the scientists at Raincoast Conservation Foundation. May 28, 1936 – June 17, 2020 Thoughtful counsel and generosity My last conversations…

On the risk of pathogens carried by hypermobile human predators

On the risk of pathogens carried by hypermobile human predators

In a recent commentary published in Nature Human Behaviour, “Hypermobile human predators,” Raincoast scientists Chris Darimont and Heather Bryan raise questions regarding potential differences between human hunters and other predators with respect to the potential for disease transmission in prey populations and point out a need for further research…