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Research: Compliance of small vessels to minimum distance regulations for humpback and killer whales in the Salish Sea

A Southern Resident killer whale fin above the water in the Salish Sea with graphs from a research paper in the foreground.

The rise of vessel traffic, the growth of the whale watching industry, increased interactions between whales and small vessels, and the precarious existence of Southern Residents in particular, has given rise to some regulations from the federal government that attempt to mitigate the harm these interactions pose…

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Wolf School with Chris Darimont

Wolf School with Chris Darimont.

The last episode of this “semester’s” Wolf School looks toward existing and emerging solutions to the conservation of wolves in British Columbia. Raincoast’s Director of Science, Dr. Chris Darimont, will also look back to share how his mentor, Chester “Lone Wolf” Starr, influenced him, all of our wolf research and the direction of Raincoast’s conservation work on BC’s coast…

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Exploring human dimensions of hunting via social science, evolutionary ecology, and personal experience

The Hunting Collective podcast brand to the left of Chris Darimont on a river in the central coast.

In episode 140 of The Hunting Collective podcast, Ben O’Brien does a fascinating and good-natured follow up interview with Dr. Barrie Gilbert. Dr. Gilbert is a prominent bear biologist, friend of Raincoast, and previous verbal sparring-partner with Ben (at least when it comes to the hunting of predators). Ben invited Dr. Gilbert back for another interview, and they made productive amends…

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Research: Addressing poor statistical support for wolf control and maternal penning as conservation measures for endangered mountain caribou

A wolf walks across the beach in the early morning light, with figure 1 in the foreground.

The scientists looked closely at the data provided in a previous study that examined how 18 caribou populations responded to different treatments including wolf culls, maternal penning, moose reduction, and combinations thereof, as well as controls. There were important errors in the statistical methods associated with that prior study…

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In memory of Dr. Michael Soulé

Paul Paquet and Michael Soule out on the land.

Michael Soulé’s work has been central to the growth of conservation science. He has been called the grandfather of conservation biology. Soulé has been an important source of knowledge, counsel, and insight to many of the scientists at Raincoast Conservation Foundation. May 28, 1936 – June 17, 2020 Thoughtful counsel and generosity My last conversations […]

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Evidence, values, policy, and the advance of science

A rhinoceros and juvenile rhinoceros stand in the brown grass of the Botswana flats.

Last month, a group of scientists published a letter in the journal Science that advocated for trophy hunting, arguing that the practice can help safeguard biodiversity. In today’s issue of Science, there are six response letters, and Raincoast scientists (Drs. Kyle Artelle, Chris Darimont and Paul Paquet), contribute to three.  Our team argues that there […]

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Research: Trophy hunters pay more to target larger-bodied carnivores

A polar bear rolls on their back with their mouth open, and there's a graph floating in the top right.

The behaviour of human hunters diverges from other animals. Other predators tend to target vulnerable individuals in prey populations. Humans, often males, tend to hunt large, reproductive-aged individuals. In the case of guided trophy hunting these species are likely perceived as costly, by increasing failure risk and risk of injury, and providing lower nutritional returns.

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