Published scientific literature

Raincoast is a team of scientists and conservationists that undertake primary research and publishes peer-reviewed science to inform our conservation objectives. As an evidence-based, conservation science organisation (science ENGO), that operates a research lab, research field station and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada.

Two people looking in a viewfinder at a salmon smolt while doing monitoring on the North Arm Jetty
Photo by Alex Harris / Raincoast Conservation Foundation.
Two people analyzing bear hair.
Photo by Grant Callegari, Hakai Magazine

Investigate. Inform. Inspire.

Raincoast’s in-house scientists, collaborating graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and professors make us unique among conservation groups. We work with First Nations, academic institutions, government and other NGOs to gather information and build support for decisions that protect marine and terrestrial ecosystems, their components and processes. We conduct applied, process-oriented, and hypothesis-driven research that has immediate and relevant utility for the conservation debate and the collective body of scientific knowledge.

Peer-reviewed science publications

Predators in natural fragments: foraging ecology of wolves in British Columbia’s central and North Coast archipelago

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Darimont, C.T., M.H.H. Price, N.N. Winchester, J. Gordon-Walker, and P.C. Paquet. 2004. Predators in natural fragments: foraging ecology of wolves of British Columbia’s central and north coast archipelago. Journal of…
Read More Predators in natural fragments: foraging ecology of wolves in British Columbia’s central and North Coast archipelago

The Gray Wolves, Canis Lupus, of British Columbia’s Central and North Coast: Distribution and Conservation Assessment

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Darimont, C.T., and P.C. Paquet. 2002. The Gray Wolves, Canis Lupus, of British Columbia’s Central and North Coast: Distribution and Conservation Assessment. Canadian Field-Naturalist 116: 416-422. View the paper in…
Read More The Gray Wolves, Canis Lupus, of British Columbia’s Central and North Coast: Distribution and Conservation Assessment