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Photo:  A.S. Wright

British Columbia’s coastline is 900 kilometres as the crow flies, but includes over 27,000 kilometers of archipelago, inlets, islands and fjords. This geography fosters a spectacular diversity of life but also makes it vulnerable to a variety of threats, from oil spills to increasing industrialization. Our marine conservation program aims to protect marine mammals, marine birds and their habitats.

Initiatives in our Marine Research and Conservation Program

Protecting endangered killer whales

The WHaLE Project

Defining and Defending Marine Mammal Habitat 

Marine Birds

Pacific Herring


A killer whale chases a chinook salmon in the Salish Sea.

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

In both British Columbia and Washington state, fishery managers, provincial and state legislators, the sports fishing lobby, and even the whale watching industry have advocated for increased production of hatchery ...
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Aerial view of Southern Resident killer whales in the Salish Sea, and Misty Macduffee and CFAX logo in the foreground.

Interview: Why our latest court challenge to the re-approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline is critical for the Salish Sea

The Southern Resident killer whales are a small declining population. The increase in tanker traffic associated with the Trans Mountain expansion will have a significant adverse effect on these killer ...
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Southern Resident killer whales in the Salish Sea.

Saving endangered whales: Strategies from above and below the 49th parallel

On May 10, the Canadian federal government announced its first wide-ranging measures to reduce the primary threats compromising survival of the salmon-eating Southern Resident killer whales reliant on the transboundary ...
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A killer whale in the foreground, with a container ship behind it in the mouth of the Fraser River.

We’re headed back to court for killer whales

Today we are returning to court with partners Ecojustice and Living Oceans Society to challenge the federal government’s re-approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. Our lawyers at Ecojustice submitted ...
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Two killer whales come to the surface of the Salish Sea.

Misty MacDuffee on CFAX 1070 talking about the approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline

The day after the federal government approved the Trans Mountain Pipeline yet again, Raincoast’s Wild Salmon Program Director, Misty MacDuffee spoke with Mark Brennae on CFAX 1070 to talk pipelines, ...
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A Humpback whale fin is visible above the surface of the ocean.

Ecological legacy of coastal B.C. hangs in the balance

British Columbia’s north and central coast, also known as the Great Bear Rainforest, along with Haida Gwaii, hosts a uniquely biodiverse region that is becoming increasingly rare in this world ...
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A single Southern Resident killer whale surfaces in the Salish Sea.

No half measures for Southern Resident killer whales

For the last several months Raincoast and our partners have been working diligently to inform government about what is required for Southern Resident killer whale recovery. Right now, as we ...
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L121 and calf in the Salish Sea.

NEB recommends Trans Mountain proceed despite “significant adverse effects” to Southern Residents

The National Energy Board (NEB) has recommended that the Trans Mountain expansion project should proceed despite the “significant adverse effects” of oil tankers on the critically endangered population of Southern ...
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Killer Whales in the foreground and text: Victoria April 18 Panel

Panel: the future of killer whale recovery

Join us this April, either in person or on online, as we discuss the challenges ahead in the recovery of the endangered Southern Resident killer whales. With the Southern Resident ...
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Killer whales spyhop with a tanker in the background and population viability maps in the foreground.

The National Energy Board and killer whales, on As It Happens

While we are glad that the NEB recognizes that the project will have significant adverse effects on Southern Resident killer whales, we don’t agree that Trans Mountain’s purported benefits are ...
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J16 spy hops: Southern Resident killer whale.

No mitigation measures can protect Southern Resident killer whales from the noise of Trans Mountain’s tanker traffic

Today the National Energy Board (NEB) recommended that the Trans Mountain Expansion should proceed despite the consequence of oil tankers on the critically endangered Southern Resident killer whale population. While ...
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Beam Reach Haro Strait Salish Sea, with a map of the Southern Resident killer whale critical habitat and the tanker route tot he Trans Mountain Expansion Burnaby terminal.

Raincoast’s new evidence on Southern Resident killer whales for the National Energy Board’s reconsideration of the Trans Mountain Expansion

The National Energy Board is now preparing its recommendations to cabinet on the Trans Mountain Expansion. When we won our legal case in the federal court of appeal in August ...
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Seals hanging out on a rocky outcropping, soaking up some sunshine.

Seals and sea lions in the Salish Sea are all part of a healthy food web

Since the killing of seals and sea lions ended in the 1970s, pinnipeds in the Salish Sea have been recovering. The recovery of seals slowed by 2000 and for the ...
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The Achiever with a misty mountain in the background.

April conservation expedition with Raincoast’s Dr. Paul Paquet

This April we are partnering with Bluewater Adventures for a unique trip through the Canadian Gulf Islands and the Salish Sea, which will feature Raincoast’s Dr. Paul Paquet as the ...
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Southern Resident killer whales swim by in the Salish Sea.

Southern Resident killer whales need more than luck

The Southern Resident killer whales were in need of some good fortune. It came on January 10th with the appearance of a new calf, L124, whose sex is unknown and ...
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