New research on ecotypes clarifies how they can illuminate our understanding of adaptation and evolution

New research on ecotypes clarifies how they can illuminate our understanding of adaptation and evolution

This article systematically reviews the literature on ecotype designations and reflects on recent advances in genetic science to show that genetic analyses can provide concrete evidence for the designation of ecotypes, which has implications for conservation decision making.

Research: Differentiating between regulation and hunting as conservation interventions

Research: Differentiating between regulation and hunting as conservation interventions

Wildlife conservation literature and public discourse, too often gloss over the important difference between hunting and the regulation of hunting. This is so common that there is a persistent, misinformed idea that extinctions have been avoided through the act of hunting. Historically, the regulation of hunting, not hunting itself, has averted extinction…

Chris Genovali and Terry Moore on trophy hunting and the changing paradigm of “wildlife as commodity”

Chris Genovali and Terry Moore on trophy hunting and the changing paradigm of “wildlife as commodity”

This summer Raincoast executive director Chris Genovali spoke with Terry Moore to discuss the problems with trophy hunting in BC and globally. We learned last week that Terry Moore passed away. Our sincere condolences to Terry’s family and to his colleagues at CFAX. We have deep respect for his body of work as a journalist…

On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

On the hunt for science in ‘science-based’ hunts

For years, British Columbia’s wildlife management practices, especially its wolf cull and grizzly bear hunt, have been controversial. In 2015, then-Premier Christy Clark defended the province’s wildlife policies, stating they were grounded in sound science. That, at least, was the claim. And not one unique to British Columbia. In fact, hunting in Canada and the…

New study casts doubt on scientific basis of wildlife management in North America, offers a way forward

New study casts doubt on scientific basis of wildlife management in North America, offers a way forward

A new study, “Hallmarks of science missing from North American wildlife management”, released today in the AAAS Open Access journal Science Advances, identified four key hallmarks expected of science-based management: clear objectives, use of evidence, transparency and external review. Combined, these hallmarks provide the checks and balances that give rigour to science-based approaches…