Tracking Raincoast, past, present, and future

Tracking Raincoast, past, present, and future

As this decade closes, it’s timely to celebrate what we have collectively achieved for BC’s coast.  Raincoast’s past in the Kitlope takes us back three decades to 1990, when Brian Falconer first visited at the invitation of the Haisla and Xenaksiala. The Nations were working to save the Kitlope from clearcut logging, which they ultimately…

A gift to end commercial trophy hunting of coastal carnivores

A gift to end commercial trophy hunting of coastal carnivores

#GivingTuesday is a global movement of generosity that has a huge impact on smaller charitable organizations like Raincoast. Raincoast is funded by donations from people like you and those donations allow us to continue our work of protecting the wildlife of BC’s coast, the Salish Sea, Great Bear Rainforest and beyond. 100% of your donations…

B.C.’s human-wildlife conflict response needs reform

B.C.’s human-wildlife conflict response needs reform

Recent events have raised important legal questions about the policies, practices, and procedures of the British Columbia Conservation Officer Service (BCCOS) for responding to human-wildlife conflicts. This past summer was marked by multiple encounters involving people and black bears in the Lower Mainland, with accompanying BCCOS-related controversy as well. In a high-profile incident in Coquitlam,…

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

Increasing salmon hatcheries could do more harm than good for Chinook and Southern Resident killer whales

Hatcheries have failed to protect or restore the old ages, big sizes, range of migration times and diversity of wild Chinook salmon. For Southern Residents to recover, the age structure and run timing of wild Chinook runs, along with abundance, need to be restored. This is not the objective of hatcheries…

Approval of Trans Mountain expansion puts Fraser River salmon and Salish Sea estuaries at risk

Approval of Trans Mountain expansion puts Fraser River salmon and Salish Sea estuaries at risk

The Fraser River in British Columbia remains one of the world’s most productive salmon rivers. Equally significant is the Fraser River’s estuary, which serves as vital habitat for fish, bird, and mammal species that are linked across thousands of kilometers of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. All Fraser River populations of salmon…