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For the coast


Ecological legacy of coastal B.C. hangs in the balance

A Humpback whale fin is visible above the surface of the ocean.

Published on 2019.05.31 | by Misty MacDuffee, Wild Salmon Program Director & Chris Genovali, Executive Director | in For the coast

One hundred years ago, whaling largely extirpated humpback and fin whales from the inside waters of the B.C. coast. As the federal government looks to codify a 35-year moratorium on oil-tanker traffic into law, these whale populations are recovering and returning to their historic feeding grounds…

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Back to the Kitlope

Cecil Paul and Brian Falconer sit on a river bank speaking about the Kitlope.

Published on 2019.05.21 | by Brian Falconer, Guide Outfitter Coordinator | in For the coast

While Kitlope is protected from logging, and the current ban protects grizzly bears from hunting, there remains unfinished business in the Kitlope. Until now, commercial guides have been bringing trophy hunters into this place…

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NEB recommends Trans Mountain proceed despite “significant adverse effects” to Southern Residents

L121 and calf in the Salish Sea.

Published on 2019.03.20 | by Chris Genovali, Misty MacDuffee & Paul Paquet | in For the coast

The National Energy Board (NEB) has recommended that the Trans Mountain expansion project should proceed despite the “significant adverse effects” of oil tankers on the critically endangered population of Southern Resident killer whales. Although we disagree with the NEB’s conclusion, their review of the project effects on killer whales is forthright and portrays the severity of the current situation…

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Diversity of salmon species a necessary metric to understanding how bears feed

A black bear on the left is standing on large mossy rocks. There is a stream with a small water fall the right, and a salmon is jumping out of the water in the direction of the bear. The bear has its left paw extended. It looks like a sunny day, although the sky is not in the photo.

Published on 2019.03.19 | by Christina Service, Raincoast Applied Conservation Lab | in For the coast

Salmon biomass is a measure of the total kilograms of spawning salmon. Many who are in the role of implementing conservation strategies and policies think that when it comes to bears, or terrestrial wildlife, more salmon biomass simply means more eating. However, our recent research published…

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Provincial Wild Salmon Secretariat needs a focus on habitat

A salmon swims in to the current on the bottom of the Lower Fraser river: closeup of a salmon nose.

Published on 2019.02.19 | by Misty MacDuffee, Wild Salmon Program Director & Chris Genovali, Executive Director | in For the coast

In order to recover and sustainably manage depleted wild salmon populations, place-based management and the restoration of salmon watersheds is the best way forward given the changing environmental conditions that confront these fish and the value that British Columbians place on them.

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Canada should rethink unproven, dangerous chemical ‘cleanup’ of marine oil spills

J50 and J42 in the Salish Sea.

Published on 2019.01.07 | by Kate Logan & Chris Genovali | in For the coast

As noted, Corexit can also be toxic to wildlife. For some species, such as herring embryos, toxicity occurs because Corexit does what it was designed to do: increase the concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in the water column. However, there is also a growing body of research, much of it conducted in response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster in 2010…

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Friday is the last day to make a bid in our online auction

Ilona Mihalik stands in front of an epic Grizzly bear photo as part of the One Shot for Coastal Carnivores exhibit.

Published on 2018.12.11 | by Ross Dixon, Communications & Development Director | in For the coast

You can still support the campaign and keep a memento through the purchase of a limited edition print and you have until Friday at 6pm to make your bid…

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On the brink of campaign success – New $50,000 match funding

A Grizzly bear rests on the shores of the Great Bear Rainforest.

Published on 2018.12.04 | by Brian Falconer, Guide Outfitter Coordinator | in For the coast

From community events to marathon runners, grizzly bath bombs to grizzly bars, so many people have stepped up to support our efforts in partnership with Coastal First Nations. Each dollar you donate will now be doubled. Help us make 2018 a year to remember…

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Maxing out to protect coastal carnivores

Gio runs on the treadmill with a CO2 mask testing his oxygen uptake.

Published on 2018.11.26 | by Giordano Corlazzoli | in For the coast

Hello again! If you read my first post from back in July, you’ll remember that I planned to run the length of the Island from Port Hardy to Victoria that summer. Due to several reasons, such as various injuries and a few issues regarding travel, I was not able to start my run as planned. […]

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