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Raincoast Conservation Foundation

We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach ‘informed advocacy’ and it is unique amongst conservation efforts. We investigate to understand coastal species and processes. We inform by bringing science to decision makers and communities. We inspire action to protect wildlife and their wilderness habitats.

Recent articles

Field Journal, August 2001

Field Journal, August 2001
Karen McAllister Bella Bella, 2001 We all wore waders, we split up into three groups and headed up the river, as far as we could go. Ian and Chris went WAY up there. Erica and I began our trek just at the mouth of river, and followed a trail up the steep cliffs. We crossed […]

The Gray Wolves, Canis Lupus, of British Columbia’s Central and North Coast: Distribution and Conservation Assessment

Darimont, C.T., and P.C. Paquet. 2002. The Gray Wolves, Canis Lupus, of British Columbia’s Central and North Coast: Distribution and Conservation Assessment. Canadian Field-Naturalist 116: 416-422. View the paper in .PDF

The Gray Wolves (Canis Lupus) of British Columbia’s Coastal Rainforests

Darimont and Paquet. Wolf-deer systems in the Great Bear Rainforest face a significant threat from large-scale industrial clearcut logging. Recognizing this threat, the Coastal Wolf Project is part of Raincoast’s mandate to support ecological research so that information can be applied to land-use plans that will dictate the future of this invaluable landscape. View the […]

Conservation Areas Design for the Central Coast of British Columbia (2000) Executive Summary only

Richard Jeo, M.A. Sanjayan, Dennis Sizemore Over the last century, the North American coastal temperate rainforest, a globally rare ecosystem, has been reduced by human activities, primarily logging, to about half its former range. However, large, contiguous, relatively intact areas remain in the central coast of British Columbia (BC) – a region where viable populations […]