Oil cards expected to wash up along Richmond’s shores

 

Environmentalists host experiment on Fraser River to simulate potentially harmful oil spill

Graeme Wood / Richmond News

August 27, 2014

If you’ve walked along the dyke recently, you might be asking yourself: What are those yellow things floating in the Fraser River or stuck on the rocks?

Well, they’re biodegradable wooden cards, tossed overboard by environmentalists from the Georgia Strait Alliance and Raincoast Conservation Foundation on Tuesday to simulate the rapid dispersion of oil in the event of a failure from Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline, which crosses the river near the Port Mann Bridge.

This was the fourth round of card experiments — which began in October — and the first time the groups dropped cards in the river. They also dropped cards in eight other locations related to pipeline or shipping routes in nearby waters.

The two groups, in concert with the City of Vancouver, have been applying this experiment to protest the planned twinning of the existing pipeline that will see up to a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic in Burrard Inlet…

To read the full article please visit the Richmond News website.

 

To celebrate the end of the year, we are so happy to be able to offer matching campaigns on two of our most pressing fundraising initiatives.

All donations to both the Southern Great Bear Rainforest tenure acquisition and our KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest initiative, will be matched until the end of the year. This is a great opportunity for our supporters, like you, to make your impact go twice as far, while benefiting from tax deductions.

Help us secure KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest on S,DÁYES (Pender Island). Together with Pender Islands Conservancy, Raincoast is raising $2.18 million to purchase a 45 acre coastal property on the edge of the Salish Sea.

Safeguarding Coastal Carnivores in the Southern Great Bear Rainforest tenure. We are currently raising funds to stop commercial trophy hunting in more than a quarter of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia.