Canada’s Raincoast at Risk: Picture an oil-free coast forever

Paintings, prints, carvings and sculpture mingle with essays and poetry on nature

 BY MARY ANN MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE VANCOUVER SUN

Sherry Kirkvold, a naturalist who edited Canada’s Raincoast at Risk, introduces the book of art, poetry and prose with an impassioned essay that begins: “They call it a time before memory — a time so long ago that the voices of history no longer recount an unbroken story.”

The story ascends in myths, legends and artful renderings of the treasures of the Great Bear Rainforest. It’s a 7.4-million-hectare area of British Columbia that encompasses the North Coast, the Central Coast and the offshore archipelago of Haida Gwaii.

The 50 artists featured in the book created paintings, prints, carvings and sculptures to reflect their experience of the dramatic beauty and ecological diversity of B.C.’s coast. Among them are Robert Bateman, Robert Davidson, Carol Evans, Mae Moore, Roy Henry Vickers and Alison Watt.

Six expeditions took place in July 2012 as the artists were transported to the Great Bear Rainforest by various tour boat operators and on the Raincoast Conservation Foundation’s research vessel, Achiever…

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